TPC: Thermoplastic Copolyester Elastomer

General Properties

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TPC

Thermoplastic Copolyester Elastomer


Thermoplastic copolyester elastomers are sometimes also referred to as thermoplastic polyester elastomers (TPE-E), thermo- plastic copolyesters (TPC) or copolyester elastomers (COPE). They are block copolymers of alternating hard and soft segments with backbones consisting of ether and/or ester groups – in accordance with ISO 18064*.

*DIN EN ISO 18064, Thermoplastic elastomers – Nomenclature and abbreviated terms.
Due to the diversity of existing structures of this thermoplastic elastomer no specifi c chemical structure is given.

Structural Formula


Properties

Glass Transition TemperatureThe glass transition is one of the most important properties of amorphous and semi-crystalline materials, e.g., inorganic glasses, amorphous metals, polymers, pharmaceuticals and food ingredients, etc., and describes the temperature region where the mechanical properties of the materials change from hard and brittle to more soft, deformable or rubbery.Glass Transition Temperature0 to 60°C
Melting Temperatures and EnthalpiesThe enthalpy of fusion of a substance, also known as latent heat, is a measure of the energy input, typically heat, which is necessary to convert a substance from solid to liquid state. The melting point of a substance is the temperature at which it changes state from solid (crystalline) to liquid (isotropic melt).Melting Temperature190 to 230°C
Melting Temperatures and EnthalpiesThe enthalpy of fusion of a substance, also known as latent heat, is a measure of the energy input, typically heat, which is necessary to convert a substance from solid to liquid state. The melting point of a substance is the temperature at which it changes state from solid (crystalline) to liquid (isotropic melt).Melting Enthalpy-
Decomposition Temperature395 to 420°C
Young's Modulus50 to 1000 MPa
Coefficient of Linear Thermal Expansion165 to 200 *10-6/K
Specific Heat Capacity1.90 to 2.22 J/(g*K)
Thermal ConductivityThermal conductivity (λ with the unit W/(m•K)) describes the transport of energy – in the form of heat – through a body of mass as the result of a temperature gradient (see fig. 1). According to the second law of thermodynamics, heat always flows in the direction of the lower temperature.Thermal Conductivity0.10 to 0.19 W/(m*K)
Density1.0 to 1.2 g/cm³
MorphologyThermoplastic elastomer, block copolymer with hard and soft segments
General propertiesGood resistance to fuels and lubricating greases. Good hydrolysis resistance. Good abrasion resistance
ProcessingInjection molding, extrusion, blow molding
ApplicationsAutomotive industry. Technical rubber articles (belts, pulleys, O-rings, band conveyors). Electrical sector (e.g., cable sheathings, plug-in connectors). Shoe soles (soccer shoes)

NETZSCH Measurement

InstrumentDSC 204 F1 Phoenix®
Sample Mass12.13 mg
IsothermalTests at controlled and constant temperature are called isothermal.Isothermal Phase8 min
Heating/Colling Rates10 K/min
CrucibleAl, pierced lid
AtmosphereN2 (40 ml/min)

Evaluation

In the 2nd heating (red), the polymer first shows a Glass Transition TemperatureThe glass transition is one of the most important properties of amorphous and semi-crystalline materials, e.g., inorganic glasses, amorphous metals, polymers, pharmaceuticals and food ingredients, etc., and describes the temperature region where the mechanical properties of the materials change from hard and brittle to more soft, deformable or rubbery.glass transition at 17°C (midpoint, Δcp 0.17 J/(g*K)) and finally an endothermal melting effect (peak temperature 219°C, heat of fusion 38 J/g), directly preceded by an ExothermicA sample transition or a reaction is exothermic if heat is generated.exothermal Post Crystallization (Cold Crystallization)The post crystallization of semi-crystalline plastics occurs primarily at elevated temperatures and increased molecular mobility above the glass transition.post crystallization (at 203°C with an enthalpy of 0.4 J/g). The peak temperature of the melting effect with 219°C in the 2nd heating is approx. 2 K lower than in the 1st heating (blue), due to the better contact between the sample and crucible bottom after the first melting. The endothermal peak at 221°C in the 1st heating (blue) is also preceded by an although small Post Crystallization (Cold Crystallization)The post crystallization of semi-crystalline plastics occurs primarily at elevated temperatures and increased molecular mobility above the glass transition.post-crystallization at 192°C (see enlargement). The Glass Transition TemperatureThe glass transition is one of the most important properties of amorphous and semi-crystalline materials, e.g., inorganic glasses, amorphous metals, polymers, pharmaceuticals and food ingredients, etc., and describes the temperature region where the mechanical properties of the materials change from hard and brittle to more soft, deformable or rubbery.glass transition at 17°C (midpoint) is in good correlation with the behavior in the 2nd heating. Additionally, an endothermal effect at 73°C can be observed in the 1st heating (blue) that can be attributed to the melting of an additive, which is better distributed in the matrix after the first melting.