25.07.2022 by Aileen Sammler

Our NETZSCH DSC in Use at Harvard University

The Mason Group at Harvard University applies the tools of synthetic chemistry and nanotechnology to the design of materials that address basic science challenges in energy and sustainable development. We are especially proud to share the recently published articles by Harvard University that highlight our high-pressure differential scanning calorimeter supporting their research projects.

Of course, NETZSCH instruments are in use all around the globe. We are especially proud to share the recently published articles by Harvard University that highlight our high-pressure differential scanning calorimeter supporting their research projects:

The Mason Group at Harvard University applies the tools of synthetic chemistry and nanotechnology to the design of materials that address basic science challenges in energy and sustainable development.  The Group is particularly interested in the development of chemical strategies to manipulate entropic effects, Phase TransitionsThe term phase transition (or phase change) is most commonly used to describe transitions between the solid, liquid and gaseous states.phase transitions, and porosity at different length scales in inorganic and organic materials. (Source: The Mason Group)

In the latest issue of THE HARVARD GAZETTE, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Jarad Mason, and co-author, Jinyoung Seo, are talking about the development of a new class of solid-state refrigerants that could enable energy-efficient and emission-free cooling.

Photo: Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Jarad Mason (left), and co-author, Jinyoung Seo, are using the NETZSCH high-pressure DSC in the Mason Laboratory

Keeping Cool without Warming the Planet

The question is how to stay cool in days of high heat and humidity without turning to traditional air conditioning, which consumes huge amounts of electricity and emits potent climate-changing greenhouse gases. The answer potentially involves a new class of solid-state refrigerants that could enable energy-efficient and emission-free cooling. Our NETZSCH DSC helps finding answers.

Please read here the full article: Keeping cool without warming the planet – Harvard Gazette

High-Pressure DSC in Top Journals for Chemistry and Material Science

Furthermore, the Mason Group at Harvard University has recently published two papers that report the use of HP-DSC for the evaluation of barocaloric materials in top journals for chemistry and material science:

The journal Nature Communications publishes high-quality research from all areas of the natural sciences.  Prof. Jarad Mason and Jinyoung Seo are one of the authors of a recently published article in this magazine:

See here an abstract of the article published in May 2022 about colossal barocaloric effects with ultralow hysteresis in two-dimensional metal-halide perovskites:

“Pressure-induced thermal changes in solids—barocaloric effects—can be used to drive cooling cycles that offer a promising alternative to traditional vapor-compression technologies. Efficient barocaloric cooling requires materials that undergo reversible phase transitions with large entropy changes, high sensitivity to hydrostatic pressure, and minimal hysteresis, the combination of which has been challenging to achieve in existing barocaloric materials.” (Source: www.nature.com)

Differential Scanning Calorimetry by NETZSCH is also used for several experiments here.

Photo: DSC 204 HP Phoenix®® high-pressure instrument

„We chose to work with NETZSCH’s HP-DSC because of its versatility and robustness. By allowing us to reliably access high pressures up to 150 bar with a wide range of gas environments, NETZSCH’s HP-DSC has greatly facilitated our group’s efforts to investigate phase transitions in next-generation thermal materials.“

Jared Mason
Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

Read the complete article: link

Another publication about driving barocaloric effects in a molecular spin-crossover complex at low pressures you can find in the American Chemical Society journal: link


We thank the Mason Group at Harvard University and are very proud to be a part of this exciting research!