SB: Styrene/Polybutadiene copolymer

General Properties

Short Name:

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SB

Styrene/Polybutadiene copolymer


SB is a copolymer from styrene and butadiene (and sometimes additional components), in which the individual monomers are lined up either in block form (block copolymer) or one monomer is grafted on the main chain of the second monomer (graft copolymer).

Structural Formula


Properties

Glass Transition TemperatureThe glass transition is one of the most important properties of amorphous and semi-crystalline materials, e.g., inorganic glasses, amorphous metals, polymers, pharmaceuticals and food ingredients, etc., and describes the temperature region where the mechanical properties of the materials change from hard and brittle to more soft, deformable or rubbery.Glass Transition Temperature-90 to -50 / 80 to 110°C
Melting Temperatures and EnthalpiesThe enthalpy of fusion of a substance, also known as latent heat, is a measure of the energy input, typically heat, which is necessary to convert a substance from solid to liquid state. The melting point of a substance is the temperature at which it changes state from solid (crystalline) to liquid (isotropic melt).Melting Temperature-
Melting Temperatures and EnthalpiesThe enthalpy of fusion of a substance, also known as latent heat, is a measure of the energy input, typically heat, which is necessary to convert a substance from solid to liquid state. The melting point of a substance is the temperature at which it changes state from solid (crystalline) to liquid (isotropic melt).Melting Enthalpy-
Decomposition reactionA decomposition reaction is a thermally induced reaction of a chemical compound forming solid and/or gaseous products. Decomposition Temperature440 to 455°C
Young's Modulus1800 to 2500 MPa
Coefficient of Linear Thermal Expansion (CLTE/CTE)The coefficient of linear thermal expansion (CLTE) describes the length change of a material as a function of the temperature.Coefficient of Linear Thermal Expansion70 *10-6/K
Specific Heat Capacity1.2 to 1.3 J/(g*K)
Thermal ConductivityThermal conductivity (λ with the unit W/(m•K)) describes the transport of energy – in the form of heat – through a body of mass as the result of a temperature gradient (see fig. 1). According to the second law of thermodynamics, heat always flows in the direction of the lower temperature.Thermal Conductivity0.17 to 0.18 W/(m*K)
DensityThe mass density is defined as the ratio between mass and volume. Density1.05 g/cm³
MorphologyAmorphous thermoplastic
General propertiesHigh transparency, high toughness and stiffness
ProcessingInjection molding, extrusion, deep drawing
ApplicationsPackaging, toys

NETZSCH Measurement

InstrumentDSC 204 F1 Phoenix®
Sample Mass12.17 mg
IsothermalTests at controlled and constant temperature are called isothermal.Isothermal Phases5 min
Heating/Colling Rates10 K/min
CrucibleAl, pierced lid
AtmosphereN2 (40 ml/min)

Evaluation

Both for block and graft copolymers, the characteristic properties of the monomers are largely retained so that SB has two Glass Transition TemperatureThe glass transition is one of the most important properties of amorphous and semi-crystalline materials, e.g., inorganic glasses, amorphous metals, polymers, pharmaceuticals and food ingredients, etc., and describes the temperature region where the mechanical properties of the materials change from hard and brittle to more soft, deformable or rubbery.glass transitions. The Glass Transition TemperatureThe glass transition is one of the most important properties of amorphous and semi-crystalline materials, e.g., inorganic glasses, amorphous metals, polymers, pharmaceuticals and food ingredients, etc., and describes the temperature region where the mechanical properties of the materials change from hard and brittle to more soft, deformable or rubbery.glass transition in the low-temperature range (here in both heatings at -84°C, midpoint) is due to the butadiene component. The Glass Transition TemperatureThe glass transition is one of the most important properties of amorphous and semi-crystalline materials, e.g., inorganic glasses, amorphous metals, polymers, pharmaceuticals and food ingredients, etc., and describes the temperature region where the mechanical properties of the materials change from hard and brittle to more soft, deformable or rubbery.glass transition at 98°C (2nd heating, red, midpoint) is due to the styrene component. The irreversible effect in the 1st heating (peak temperature 76°C) indicates the release of strong tensions in the material that are caused by the thermomechanical history of the polymer.