PSU: Polysulfone

General Properties

Short Name:

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PSU

Polysulfone


Polysulfone belongs to the family of polyaryl sulfones and is a high-performance thermoplastic material. Due to its molecular structure, it is transparent. Polyethersulfone (PESU) and polyphenylsulfones (PPSU) also belong to the family of polyaryl sulfones.

Structural Formula


Properties

Glass Transition TemperatureThe glass transition is one of the most important properties of amorphous and semi-crystalline materials, e.g., inorganic glasses, amorphous metals, polymers, pharmaceuticals and food ingredients, etc., and describes the temperature region where the mechanical properties of the materials change from hard and brittle to more soft, deformable or rubbery.Glass Transition Temperature185 to 190°C
Melting Temperatures and EnthalpiesThe enthalpy of fusion of a substance, also known as latent heat, is a measure of the energy input, typically heat, which is necessary to convert a substance from solid to liquid state. The melting point of a substance is the temperature at which it changes state from solid (crystalline) to liquid (isotropic melt).Melting Temperature-
Melting Temperatures and EnthalpiesThe enthalpy of fusion of a substance, also known as latent heat, is a measure of the energy input, typically heat, which is necessary to convert a substance from solid to liquid state. The melting point of a substance is the temperature at which it changes state from solid (crystalline) to liquid (isotropic melt).Melting Enthalpy-
Decomposition reactionA decomposition reaction is a thermally induced reaction of a chemical compound forming solid and/or gaseous products. Decomposition Temperature530 to 540°C
Young's Modulus2500 to 2700 MPa
Coefficient of Linear Thermal Expansion (CLTE/CTE)The coefficient of linear thermal expansion (CLTE) describes the length change of a material as a function of the temperature.Coefficient of Linear Thermal Expansion50 to 60 *10-6/K
Specific Heat Capacity1.37 J/(g*K)
Thermal ConductivityThermal conductivity (λ with the unit W/(m•K)) describes the transport of energy – in the form of heat – through a body of mass as the result of a temperature gradient (see fig. 1). According to the second law of thermodynamics, heat always flows in the direction of the lower temperature.Thermal Conductivity0.15 W/(m*K)
DensityThe mass density is defined as the ratio between mass and volume. Density1.24 to 1.25 g/cm³
MorphologyAmorphous polymer
General propertiesHigh stability and stiffness. Good toughness. Good chemical resistance. Low water absorption. Very good electrical insulation properties
ProcessingInjection molding, extrusion for the production of thin films
ApplicationsElectrical engineering (e.g., condensators). Medical engineering. Food technology. Aerospace (helmets). Chemical and laboratory equipment

NETZSCH Measurement

InstrumentDSC 204 F1 Phoenix®
Sample Mass12.52 mg
IsothermalTests at controlled and constant temperature are called isothermal.Isothermal Phase3 min / 3 min / 5 min
Heating/Colling Rates10 K/min
CrucibleAl, pierced lid
AtmosphereN2 (40 ml/min)

Evaluation

Since PSU is entirely amorphous, the DSC curves above show only one Glass Transition TemperatureThe glass transition is one of the most important properties of amorphous and semi-crystalline materials, e.g., inorganic glasses, amorphous metals, polymers, pharmaceuticals and food ingredients, etc., and describes the temperature region where the mechanical properties of the materials change from hard and brittle to more soft, deformable or rubbery.glass transition with a Glass Transition TemperatureThe glass transition is one of the most important properties of amorphous and semi-crystalline materials, e.g., inorganic glasses, amorphous metals, polymers, pharmaceuticals and food ingredients, etc., and describes the temperature region where the mechanical properties of the materials change from hard and brittle to more soft, deformable or rubbery.glass transition midpoint temperature at 187°C in the 2nd heating (red) and 188°C in the 1st heating (blue). The Glass Transition TemperatureThe glass transition is one of the most important properties of amorphous and semi-crystalline materials, e.g., inorganic glasses, amorphous metals, polymers, pharmaceuticals and food ingredients, etc., and describes the temperature region where the mechanical properties of the materials change from hard and brittle to more soft, deformable or rubbery.glass transition in the 2nd heating is overlapped by a larger RelaxationWhen a constant strain is applied to a rubber compound, the force necessary to maintain that strain is not constant but decreases with time; this behavior is known as stress relaxation. The process responsible for stress relaxation can be physical or chemical, and under normal conditions, both will occur at the same time. relaxation peak than in the 1st heating. This indicates an increase in short-range order during the controlled cooling at 10 K/min than was originally present in the material. The heights of the Glass Transition TemperatureThe glass transition is one of the most important properties of amorphous and semi-crystalline materials, e.g., inorganic glasses, amorphous metals, polymers, pharmaceuticals and food ingredients, etc., and describes the temperature region where the mechanical properties of the materials change from hard and brittle to more soft, deformable or rubbery.glass transition steps of 0.24 J/(g*K) (1st heating) and 0.25 J/(g*K) (2nd heating) are nearly identical.