PC: Polycarbonate

General Properties

Short Name:

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PC

Polycarbonate


Polycarbonate (PC) belongs chemically to the polyesters.

Structural Formula


Properties

Glass Transition TemperatureThe glass transition is one of the most important properties of amorphous and semi-crystalline materials, e.g., inorganic glasses, amorphous metals, polymers, pharmaceuticals and food ingredients, etc., and describes the temperature region where the mechanical properties of the materials change from hard and brittle to more soft, deformable or rubbery.Glass Transition Temperature140 to 150°C
Melting Temperatures and EnthalpiesThe enthalpy of fusion of a substance, also known as latent heat, is a measure of the energy input, typically heat, which is necessary to convert a substance from solid to liquid state. The melting point of a substance is the temperature at which it changes state from solid (crystalline) to liquid (isotropic melt).Melting Temperature-
Melting Temperatures and EnthalpiesThe enthalpy of fusion of a substance, also known as latent heat, is a measure of the energy input, typically heat, which is necessary to convert a substance from solid to liquid state. The melting point of a substance is the temperature at which it changes state from solid (crystalline) to liquid (isotropic melt).Melting Enthalpy-
Decomposition Temperature480 to 535°C
Young's Modulus2200 to 2400 MPa
Coefficient of Linear Thermal Expansion (CLTE/CTE)The coefficient of linear thermal expansion (CLTE) describes the length change of a material as a function of the temperature.Coefficient of Linear Thermal Expansion75 to 80 *10-6/K
Specific Heat Capacity1.17 to 1.50 J/(g*K)
Thermal ConductivityThermal conductivity (λ with the unit W/(m•K)) describes the transport of energy – in the form of heat – through a body of mass as the result of a temperature gradient (see fig. 1). According to the second law of thermodynamics, heat always flows in the direction of the lower temperature.Thermal Conductivity0.19 to 0.21 W/(m*K)
DensityThe mass density is defined as the ratio between mass and volume. Density1.20 to 1.24 g/cm³
MorphologyAmorphous thermoplastic
General propertiesMedium to high stability and stiffness. Very good impact strength. Weather and radiation resistant. High transparency. Very good electrial insulating properties
ProcessingInjection molding, extrusion, deep drawing
ApplicationsElectronic components. Building sector. Optical storage media, like CD, DVD, Blue-Ray Disc Automobile, plane and safety components. Medical applications. Cellular phones. Products of daily life like, e.g., food containers

NETZSCH Measurement

InstrumentDSC 204 F1 Phoenix®
Sample Mass12.84 mg
IsothermalTests at controlled and constant temperature are called isothermal.Isothermal Phase3 min / 5 min
Heating/Colling Rates10 K/min
CrucibleAl, pierced lid
AtmosphereN2 (50 ml/min)

Evaluation

Polycarbonates are generally amorphous. For this reason, the DSC curves (in both the 1st and 2nd heating) show only a Glass Transition TemperatureThe glass transition is one of the most important properties of amorphous and semi-crystalline materials, e.g., inorganic glasses, amorphous metals, polymers, pharmaceuticals and food ingredients, etc., and describes the temperature region where the mechanical properties of the materials change from hard and brittle to more soft, deformable or rubbery.glass transition eff ect. The corresponding Glass Transition TemperatureThe glass transition is one of the most important properties of amorphous and semi-crystalline materials, e.g., inorganic glasses, amorphous metals, polymers, pharmaceuticals and food ingredients, etc., and describes the temperature region where the mechanical properties of the materials change from hard and brittle to more soft, deformable or rubbery.glass transition temperatures (midpoints) are very close to each other in both heatings at 147°C (2nd heating, red) and 148°C (1st heating, blue); the step heights (Δcp) are also similar. Both Glass Transition TemperatureThe glass transition is one of the most important properties of amorphous and semi-crystalline materials, e.g., inorganic glasses, amorphous metals, polymers, pharmaceuticals and food ingredients, etc., and describes the temperature region where the mechanical properties of the materials change from hard and brittle to more soft, deformable or rubbery.glass transition were overlapped by RelaxationWhen a constant strain is applied to a rubber compound, the force necessary to maintain that strain is not constant but decreases with time; this behavior is known as stress relaxation. The process responsible for stress relaxation can be physical or chemical, and under normal conditions, both will occur at the same time. relaxation effects.